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How to wear & care Cloth Pad

1.The first time you got your cloth pad (CP), please wash it first either hand-wash or toss them in the washing machine.

2. Snap the CP just like the pic below.

Picture credits to Mama Patch

3. It is essential to get a Wetbag to chuck soiled CP especially if you are working, out & about or in other words you doesn’t stay at home 24 hours a day.

I got my wetbag from Mum7Kids who produced the Saffa Pad for RM 15.00. It is made from Flannel PUL & the size is 8 inch X 8 inch and can store up to 7 CPs.


Then, by luck I stumbled this Dual Bag which I improvised it to be my very-the-handy-&-small wetbag so that I can put the fresh CP on one side & the soiled CP on the other side. Got it from Guardian for RM 11 & measured 5.5 inch X 4 inch, can store either 3 Regular CP OR 2 Panty Liner & 2 Regular CP. Fits in my handbag nicely.Dual wetbag is also available at Mama Patch.

4. Rinsed soiled CP under running water until water runs clear before chuck them in the wetbag.Make sure you wring them dry enough before temporary storing to bring back for further washing. Fold them up to save storing space.No worries about smell and you will be surprised soiled CP does not smell inside your wetbag.

5. During laundry, you can choose either to soak them for few minutes to remove stubborn stain or wash them immediately. You can either hand wash them together with your undies or toss them in the washing machine.

6. DO NOT SCRUB your CP.This will spoiled your CP durability.Light rubbing by hand is the best with frequent rinsing.You can also add a pinch of salt in the soaked CP in case there’s stubborn stain. NEVER EVER use Softener or Clorox as this can damage the CP fabric.

7. The Sun is the best bleacher just like it does to cloth diaper. Based on CP user’s experience sharing, recommended to wear your CP up to 4 hours on normal flow & less than 4 hours during the heaviest days.So roughly about 5 to 6 CP is needed during the heavy flow & 2-3 CP on the normal days and 1-2 on the lighter days.So no worries about leaking.You know your body best!

Next : Sneak peak on various type of Cloth Pad

Disclaimer : Not a paid review.Information based on personal experiences plus obtained from Mama Patch & Mum7Kids.

November 13, 2009 Posted by | Beauty and Feminity, Green Living, Hanz's Notes | 3 Comments

Baby Massage

Hanz’s Note : This is schedulled post.
Am away for 2 days in a row for outstation.
Will miss chit-chat & chat-hop to others.

Baby massage isn’t just about learning strokes; it’s about learning a language that builds a relationship of trust and togetherness between parent and child.

The benefits of baby massage for your child:

  • Smoothes transition from womb to the world
  • Develops baby’s first language touch
  • Teaches positive loving touch
  • Develops a feeling of being loved, respected and secure
  • Develops body, mind, awareness and coordination
  • Can help to reduce the discomfort of colic, wind and constipation
  • Helps to regulate and strengthen baby’s digestive and respiratory systems and stimulate circulatory and nervous systems
  • Promotes relaxation
  • Can help to reduce fussiness and improve quality of sleep
  • Improves skin condition

The benefits of infant massage for parents :

  • Helps parents to understand baby’s non-verbal communication
  • Enhances parents confidence and competence in dealing with baby
  • Can help with postnatal depression
  • Both parents and baby relax together
  • Promotes lactation in breastfeeding mums (through stimulation of hormones)
  • Promotes nurturing instinct (through stimulation of hormone oxytocin)

Hanz’s Share: Me did’nt massage my boys, but rub backside during nursing and sleeptime.During confinement till my boys about 4 months, rub both their legs to avoid wind especially behind the knees and feet.It helps rather you rub the tummy itself.

November 5, 2009 Posted by | Attachment Parenting, Hanz's Notes, Just Baby, Natural Parenting | 5 Comments

Toddler Monthly Notes: Your 17-Month-Old

Separations & that special blankie

Has your toddler yet chosen a special teddy or blankie to help him weather life’s more stressful moments, like your leaving him with a babysitter or taking him for shots? If it hasn’t already, that special lovey or ‘comfort’ object will become one of the most important, if not the most important items in your household for some time to come.

Somewhere between the ages of 15 & 19 months, a toddler becomes capable of forming a mental image of you that he can conjure up when you’re around. Unfortunately, that mental image may not always be sufficient to sustain him emotionally during even the briefest separation like you need to run upstairs to grab a diaper.

A comfort object won’t magically stop child’s tears or prevent your child from feeling anxiety, but once your’re away, it can make your absence that much more tolerable.If she can’t always rely on you to be next to her at every waking moment, well then your child may as well turn to the comfort object.

To enhance your toddler’s comfort factor when you’re not around, encourage your child to use the object for role-play. Say,”Time for Teddy to go to sleep.” Together, tuck the teddy inside a blanket, read him favourite book & give him a hug & kiss. Then allow him to help you turn off the lights & say good night.

Let your child take the comfort object along with him on those errands & trips that can seem disconcertingly unpredictable to your toddler. If you deprive him of a comfort object, you send a message that he’ll just have to cope when he’s feeling uncomfortable or you’re not around. Your child is unlikely to outgrow his object of affection at any time soon.

More comfort

Sometimes, it can seem as though your 17-month-old is on a roller-coaster ride with his emotions- deliriously happy one moment , cranky & distressed the next. That’s perfectly normal & what he needs is for you to stay close to him on that ride. At 17month, your child obviously has an intense need for a great deal of attention & affection from you. Here are few more ways to achieve that:

* Graduate to hide & seek. The simple peek-a-boo game that your child adored as a baby does’nt mean that it does’nt appreciate it any more.Chase your toddler from one room to the next. Act extremely surprised & delighted to see him.

* If you’re pregnant, feel free to talk about the new baby coming. Your 17 month old may not comprehend the event, there’s no harm in talking casually about it & sharing books with your toddler that may help familiarize the concept of becoming a big brother.

Hanz’s Share : The Lion, the soft cuddly toy & 2 pillows are Baby Hambali’s comfort object. Orang tua2 panggil bantal busuk, kan? The bantal is more towards sleeping & substitute of Lion at his Nursery as we don’t want him to bring the Lion there due to many reasons. But, to other places, yes, we bring the Lion.It does help him to understand as sometimes, we use the The Lion to teach. For example if he is reluctant to sleep, we said out loud,”Lion nak tidur.Adik tak nak tidur dengan Lion?” This gesture, to the extent, he handed his Lion to my boob so the Lion can get fair share of Nenen as well. Hilarious!! But, it does make sense.

October 21, 2009 Posted by | Hanz's Notes, Just Toddler, Parenting in General | 12 Comments

Why use Reusable Bag is a must!

The ugly truth about our plastic bag that being introduced just over 25 years ago. Society’s consumption rate is now estimated at well over 500,000,000,000 (that’s 500 billion) plastic bags annually, or almost 1 million per minute! Read on these cold-hard facts…

1. Single-use bags made of high-density polyethlene (HDPE) are the main culprit. Once brought into existence to tote your purchases, they’ll accumulate & persist on our planet for up to 1,000 years.

2. Plastic bags cause over 100,000 sea turtle & other marine animal deaths every year when animals mistake them for food.

3. The average family accumulate 60 plastic bags in only four trips to the grocery store.

4. A plastic shopping bag can take anywhere from 15 to 1000 years to decompose. In a compressed landfill, deprived of atmosphere to help them biodegrade, paper bags don’t fare much better.

5. According to the Wall Street Journal, only 1% plastic bags are recycled worldwide, the rest are left to live on indefinitely in landfills.

6. The cost to recycle plastic bags so outweighs their value that most recycling facilities will not take them, leading more & more to just be thrown out with the rest of the trash.

7. Made from petroleum products and natural gas, plastic bags utilize non-renewable resources, ultimately helping to drive up fuel prices!

8. It takes 12 million barrels of oil to produce the amount of plastic bags the US uses per year.

9. Think paper bags are better? The United States cuts down 14 million trees per year simply to supply the demand for paper shopping bags!

10. It requires 13% more energy to produce 1 single paper bag than to produce 2 plastic bags.

11. Made with chemical processed at high temperatures, paper bag production releases many toxins into the atmosphere at much the same rate as plastic production.

12. Paper bags weigh nearly 10 times their counterparts in plastic, requiring more fuel to ship them out to stores.

Awareness evolved, some countries has made a move!

1. Ireland, the first European country to impose a tax on them, has decreased plastic shopping bag consumption by 90% since 2002, reducing overall plastic bag usage by 1.08 billion. That is 90% reduced consumption.

2. In a dramatic move to stem a tide of 60,000 metric tons of plastic bag & plastic utensil waste per year, Taiwan banned both last year.

3. Windblown plastic bags are so prevalent in Africa that a cottage industry has sprung up harvesting bags & using them to weave hats & even bags. According to the BBC, one group harvests 30,000 per month.

4. Some grocery store (like Tesco) even offer discounts or points credit for customers who bring their own bags, now that’s incentive!

Lastly, it takes one small step to make a significant impact as a whole! Over a lifetime, use of reusable bags by just one person, would save over 22,000 plastics bags. Isn’t it that better incentive?

You there, bila lagi?

October 21, 2009 Posted by | Green Living, Hanz's Notes | 8 Comments

Why use Cloth Wipes?


Brief notes to ponder :

1. Cloth wipes can be made from many different types of fabric. Great for cleaning little hands, noses & bottoms.

2. Can be used at home & while out with wipes solutions in a personal cleansing bottle.It’s a breeze when out & about as either you take the pre-moistened wipes in a waterproof container such as small wet bag or a zip-lock sandwich bag or take them dry & wet as required. Pop the used wipe into your wet bag with your used nappies and straight into your bucket when you get home.

3. Reusable – simply toss in the wash with cloth diapers or towels (no fabric softener).

4. Don’t have any alcohol or harsh chemicals in them like disposables wipes do.

5. Can use as many as you need to get baby fresh & clean without feeling guilty about wasting wipes.

6. Comes in basic colours or as fancy as you like for prints.

7. Can replace tissue & toilet paper.Reduce energy waste in producing tissue & toilet paper.

8. Gentle to you, your baby & Mother Earth! Reduce garbage & pollution.

October 16, 2009 Posted by | Green Living, Hanz's Collectibles, Hanz's Notes | 8 Comments

Why use Cloth Pad?

Obtained from Mama Patch, SaffaPad Mum7Kids & Snexi Snuggbaby

Brief notes to ponder :-

1. Cloth Pad (CP) are environmentally friendly & do not contribute to landfill as they are reusable & do not come in or contain plastic packaging. When CP wears out (after years of use), those made from natural materials can be composted whereas disposable sanitary napkins made from synthetic materials cannot be recycled or composted.They can be made from old pillow cases & towels.Some CP use hemp as the absorbent core which is more environmentally friendly to grow when compared with cotton or wood pulp.

2. Less expensive in the long term.

3. Highly customizable.

4. Still convenient as they can simply be cleaned in washing machine & before wash, soiled CP can be stored in its own wetbag.

5. Less likely to cause rashes, contact dermatitis as well as helping women affected with certain types of vaginitis.

6. Many women noted that after being a CP user, they have shorter periods, lighter flow & low/less cramping.

7. Reduce the scent of menstrual blood on the CP. As they are more breathable than the average disposable sanitary pads, they carry less odor.

Source : Wikipedia

To read more, please go to this link :-
http://testimonicni.blogspot.com/2008/05/tuala-wanita.html

Next chat(s) : How to care Cloth Pad, Reviews on Cloth Pad, What Makes me convert to Cloth Pad.

October 16, 2009 Posted by | Beauty and Feminity, Green Living, Hanz's Collectibles, Hanz's Notes, Worth-read Articles | 8 Comments

Babywearing : Getting to know types of Carriers

Disclaimer : All pictures in this chat
was obtained from Google Image
& this note is courtesy of
Get Your Hands Back (http://www.getyourhandsback.co.uk)

Babywearing Definition from Wikipedia:-

Babywearing is the practice of wearing or carrying a baby or child in a sling or other form of carrier. Babywearing is far from new and has been practised for centuries around the world. In the industrialized world, babywearing has gained popularity in recent decades, partly under influence of advocates of attachment parenting; however, not all parents who babywear consider themselves attachment parents. Babywearing is a form of baby transport.


Types of Carriers:-

1. Ring Sling

A ring sling consists of a length of fabric with two rings at one end. The fabric is threaded through the rings to create a loop, and then placed over the wears head and one arm, so that it sits across the body from shoulder to opposite hip. The size of the sling can be adjusted to make a perfect fit for both carrier and baby, giving excellent support and comfort.

Ring slings can be used to carry baby lying down, as in a hammock, sitting facing in or out (in a “froggy” position, with legs crossed inside the fabric of the sling), or on the carrier’s hip. They are suitable from birth, and will usually last until baby is too heavy for your comfort. As they are a one-shouldered carrier, they can cause some discomfort when used with older, heavier babies or toddlers, or for prolonged periods.

2. Pouch

This is very similar to the ring sling, but the pouch sling is a fixed size, and it is very important to take accurate measurements prior to ordering a pouch sling so as to ensure a perfect fit (not usually a sling that mummy and daddy can share). Baby can be worn in the same positions as in a ring sling – lying down, on the hip or upright. There are no buckles or rings to fasten – it’s a case of pop it on and off you go! They are very convenient and usually fold up very small, so are fabulous for taking with you on shopping trips.

3. Mei Tai & Soft Structured Carrier

A mei tai is made from a square panel of fabric with straps are the top and bottom. The bottom straps go around the wearer’s waist and the top ones go over the shoulders, crossing on the back and being tied around the waist (either front, or crossing over again and going back round to the back). With a mei tai, the weight is taken through the hips, and distributed over both shoulders, so it tends to be more comfortable for older or heavier babies and toddlers. They can be used to carry babies on the front, back or hip, and due to the long straps, and lack of buckles, one size fits most. As with wraps and slings, mei tais carry baby in a natural seated position, which is best for their delicate spine and hip development, and also for their comfort.

If the tying sounds a bit fiddly for you, there are now some hybrid slings, known as Soft Structured Carriers, which are like mei tais but with buckles instead of long straps. These are a little easier to put on for a novice, but have the disadvantage of needing to be adjusted for different people. They are often not quite as supportive, or comfortable as some of the mei tais, so are less suitable for younger babies.

Mei Tai

Soft Structured Carrier (SSC)

4. Wraps

Wrap-around slings come in two varieties – stretchy and woven. They are both the same design, which is basically a long length of fabric. This is used to wrap around both you and baby, so as to fasten you together. The simplicity means that they can be used in a great many positions, with one size fitting all. It is generally accepted that woven are longer lasting, and the stretchy wraps can sag once baby becomes heavier. However, woven wraps can take a little more practice to perfect the tying, and stretchy wraps are considered a better option for novice wearers. They both work in a similar way to the mei tai, distributing the baby’s weight through the wearer’s hips and back, with the shoulders being used for support. They can look very daunting to the first time user.


5
. Baby Carrier

The structured carrier is probably what most new mums automatically think of when they think of a baby carrier. They are more structured than the other types, and therefore les flexible. They fasten using buckles, so need to be adjusted if you intend to share the babywearing, and can be a little fiddly to put on, particularly if they incorporate a harness which the baby sits in. Some of the newer styles can be worn in multiple positions, but most tend to be front-carry only, although baby can be carried facing outwards when they are a little older.

This type of carrier tends not to be as comfortable as other types, either for the wearer or the baby, due to the positioning of the baby – the baby can have a tendency to be supported through the spine, rather than the legs, putting undue pressure on the spine. In addition, many parents find this type becomes uncomfortable once their baby becomes slightly heavier, and puts strain on the wearer’s back, due to the way the weight is distributed.

Imagine yourself dangling with support & pressuring your crotch rather you being hold in sitting position. Other carriers than this type allowing baby & toddler in sitting position which is more natural & comfortable.

Note : Babywearer Moms (even Dads) will say ‘No’ to this type of carriers.

In retrospect, other Babywearing chat I’ve posted earlier as follows:-

I’m Wearing My Baby

Babywearing = Keeping your baby happy

+ Getting on with your life


October 8, 2009 Posted by | Attachment Parenting, Babywearing, Hanz's Notes, Natural Parenting | 13 Comments

10 Reasons To Sleep Next To Your Child At Night

1. Family co-sleeping takes full advantage of the ease of breastfeeding, as there is no need to go to another room to get one’s child. A breastfeeding mother in a “family bed” can easily feed her child without having to wake fully, and can continue to get the important rest she needs. Thus co-sleeping encourages mothers to continue breastfeeding and all of its numerous benefits until the child chooses to wean.

2. According to sleep researcher James McKenna, co-sleeping increases the chances that a parent can successfully intervene to help prevent a death, whether that is due to a physiological condition or to a physical accident. He reminds parents that “co-sleeping gives the parent the best opportunity to hear the baby in crisis and to respond.” He adds that “since protection from SIDS may be related to the frequency and duration of breastfeeding, and because babies breastfeed more when co-sleeping, this practice may help to protect some breastfeeding infants.”

3. Gaps in breathing are normal during the early months of infancy, and it is likely that the mother’s breathing provides important cues to her infant, reminding him to take a breath following exhalation, preventing a SIDS situation from developing. Even if this reminder system fails, the mother is nearby to help by arousing the infant. A breastfeeding mother and baby tend to have coordinated sleeping and dreaming cycles, making her keenly sensitive to her baby. If she is sleeping close by, she will awaken if there her baby is having difficulty. But if the baby is alone, this type of life-saving intervention cannot take place.

4. Any nighttime danger to a child is reduced if there is an adult close by. Babies and children have perished in fires, have been sexually abused by visiting relatives, have been abducted from their bed, have been attacked by pets, have suffocated after vomiting, and have died or been injured in various ways that could have been prevented had a parent been nearby to help.

5. Suffocation is often listed as a danger of family co-sleeping. However, this is a real danger in only two situations: a young infant sleeping on a water-bed, thus unable to push himself up when needed, or a parent who is too intoxicated by alcohol or drugs to attend to a child’s needs. Obviously, a child who is suffocating for any reason (such as a ribbon on sleepwear getting around her neck, vomiting during sleep, asthmatic attacks) is far more likely to rouse a parent who is sleeping nearby than one sleeping in a different room. A child cared for during the night receives constant reassurance of love and support.
6. Family co-sleeping is often misunderstood as facilitating sexual abuse of children by a parent. However, the opposite is true. Parents who develop deep emotional bonds with their children by remaining close by and responsive at night, as well as during the day, are far less likely to turn to abusive behavior of any kind toward the children they love and cherish. Conversely, the fact that a child sleeps alone has never been adequate protection against a parent who intends sexual trespass, and may even make it easier for one parent to keep such activity secret from the other.

7. Shared sleep can further prevent child abuse by helping all family members to obtain the rest they need, especially if the child is breastfeeding. The child does not have to suffer needlessly or cry to bring his mother, and the mother can nurse half-asleep. The entire family awakes refreshed, with no lingering resentment toward the baby for having disturbed their sleep the night before. An exhausted parent is far more likely to abuse a child than a well-rested mother or father who has enjoyed the presence of a happily resting child through the night.

8. Crying is a signal provided by nature that is meant to disturb the parents to ensure that the baby receives the care he needs. But prolonged crying is stressful to all the family members. The sooner the baby’s needs are met, the more rest the baby and the entire family can have, and the more energy they will have for the next day. A mother sleeping next to her baby can utilize the instinctive response a new mother has to her baby’s first whimper, thus preventing the need for the hard crying that is so stressful to the baby and to all other members of the family.

9. A deeper sense of love and trust often develops between siblings who sleep near each other, lessening sibling rivalry during waking hours. Siblings who share the night as well as the day have a greater opportunity to build a deep and lasting relationship. Babies and children who are separated from other family members during the day (parents at work, siblings at school) can partially make up for these absences and reestablish important emotional bonds by spending time at night together, and by the delightful early morning family time that is otherwise often missed. Of course, home businesses and unschooling can minimize separations and deepen family bonds during the day, just as co-sleeping does at night.

10. Studies of adults in coma have shown that the presence of another person in the room significantly improves heart rate, heart rhythm, and blood pressure. It seems reasonable to assume that infants and children derive similar health benefits to having others in the same room with them.

A child who is cared for during the night as well as the day receives constant reassurance of love and support, instead of having to cope with feelings of fear, anger, and abandonment night after night. Children who have felt safe through the night as well as the day with a loving parent close by become adults who cope better with the inevitable stresses life brings. As John Holt put it so eloquently, having feelings of love and safety in early life, far from “spoiling” a child, is like “money in the bank”: a fund of trust, self-esteem and inner security which the child can draw on throughout life’s challenges.

Hanz’s Note : This great article was written by Jan Hunt from The Natural Child Project. Thanks for sharing this great article and I love to share all about natural parenting here, from today onwards.

October 7, 2009 Posted by | Attachment Parenting, Hanz's Notes, Just Baby, Just Toddler, Natural Parenting, Worth-read Articles | 9 Comments

HS505 : Teaching your child Empathy & Tolerance when interacting with others.

Hanz’s Note : It’s been so long I have not updating Hanafi’s HS progress. Blame it for festive season. Ahaks! Anyway, alhamdulillah, his HS is still ongoing despite this festive mood & that’s the beauty of HS. You decide when can take a break rather follow the school’s standard break!

This update however is an ongoing process and likely different from previous HS updates. Here I like to share on some guide & tips on how to teach a child about empathy and tolerance. Read on. Remember, teaching values is an ongoing process for any children.

Teaching Empathy

Empathy is how us as human being being aware of and being sensitive to another being and able to understand other people’s state and situation. To emphatise, children must be able to read emotional cues such as facial expression and body language.

I’ve drawn those several facial expression (and a lil touch-up by dear hubby) to introduce in-depth several facial expression of people. Then, I asked Hanafi to match those caricatures with real-life faces that match similar facial expression. After that, we discussed why and how those expression occurred.

Another way is through:-

* Example – Experiencing it firsthand by your child is beneficial and you can help him understand by explaining about the situation he just experienced. Develop a feeling vocabulary whereby children can learn to identify & label their feelings.

* Describing feelings to help kids read emotions by :-

Watch television – Be careful though on allowing your child which tv programme is most suitable for your child based on his age. Like us, we prefer to allow our boys watch children’s videos instead as we seldom watch tv due to time constraint.

We love Barney & Bear in the Big Blue House as it has many good features on values!

Listen to books being read – I can’t say enough there’s many books out there that you can always ‘invest’ it for your child. Siri Kisah Rasulullah, Siri Kisah Para Sahabat Nabi, Siri Kisah-kisah Al Quran, all is such a thumbs-up selection. Another alternative is from Grolier. They have a whole set on values which I highly recommend it. Scholastic too is good. All you need just a little effort to ‘look’ them the bookstore or your local library.

* Asking questions

Ask your child a real life situation for any values you want to highlight. If your child answer with “I don’t know’, you can ask your child to make their best guess. Always have an open discussion with your child.

Teaching Tolerance

This one comes in a list which me, myself & dear hubby are giving our best shot to follow do’s & don’ts. Read on!

i) Notice your own attitude. Parents who want their child value diversity can be sensitive to cultural stereotypes, they may have learned & make an effort to correct them.

ii) Remember that kids are always listening. Do not make jokes that perpetuate stereotypes though how harmless fun it is, it can undo tolerance & respect.

iii) Select books, toys, music, art & videos carefully. Keep in mind the powerful effect the media & pop cultures have on shaping attitudes.

iv) Point out & talk about unfair sterotypes that may be potrayed in media.

v) Answer kids questions about differences honestly & respectfully.

vi) Acknowledge & respect differences within your own family. Demonstrate acceptance of your children’s different abilities, interest & styles. Value the uniqueness of each family member.

vii) Remember that tolerance does not mean tolerating unacceptable behaviour. It means that everyone deserves to be treated with respect & should treat others respect.

viii) Help your child feel good about themselves.

ix) Give your child opportunities to work & play with others who are different from them.

x) Be enthusiastic about his response when he is in conversation and keep an eye contact with him.

October 2, 2009 Posted by | Early Childhood Education, Hanz's Notes, Homeschooling, Parenting in General | 3 Comments

Toddler Monthly Notes: Your 16-Month-Old

Teaching the rules

* Be clear. Learning social rules, such as “Don’t bite”, “Stop making a mess” is particularly long & ongoing process. Toddlers have a short attention span, they respond best to concise & straightforward language that honestly convey your feeling.

* Let him experience consequences. Let’s say your toddler had just hurled the cereal bowl to you, rather you immediately clean up the mess, handed a napkin to your child & tell him to clean it up. It is best he can feel the effect of any havoc he wrecks.

* Redirect. If your child is making bonkers over some thing, move on to something else.Let your child go on with the tantrum & simply ignore while at the same time, you show he can have another thing or another choice to do something else. Don’t let him get his way all the time because you can’t stand the tantrum.

* Try a time-out. When all the former strategies fail, set time-out for two minutes in any designated time-out spot.Sometimes, you need two minutes away from your child too to cool off & collect yourself.

Building your toddler’s confidence

Your toddler always craves your approval. Here are few constructive ways to give it to him.

* Show him how to help you. An example is like cleaning up. Plenty of praise & positive feedback can influence child’s behaviour. It is also can give confidence boost from the feeling of mastery he achieves.

* Show him how to be resilient. Your toddler learn from how you react to certain situation when emergency or crisis arises. Show him to be quick to administer the hurt & pain like getting help rather than crying of self-pitiness. This builds his character on how to handle difficult situation.

September 30, 2009 Posted by | Child's Play, Early Childhood Education, Hanz's Notes, Just Toddler, Parenting in General | 1 Comment